Working into the Back of a Chain

Most of us were taught that when working into a foundation chain, the best thing to do was to insert the hook from front to back through the front of the chain, sometimes under two legs, sometimes under one. I did it myself for years without ever thinking twice, until I learned the trick of going through the back or bump of the chain!

Any pattern can accommodate working into the back of the chain. The easiest way to tell the front of the chain from the back of the chain is to look carefully. If you see a column of Vs, that is the front of the chain. If you see a column of bumps, that is the back of the chain.

Front vs. Back

Just insert your hook from front to back through the bump, and complete your stitch as instructed.

Crochet Projects: When To Use

I first started working into the back bump of the chain because it works best for Tunisian crochet, but honestly, I now use the back of the chain for almost everything. It gives you an edging that is both more elastic and visually similar to the top edge of a row of stitches.

By working into the back of the chain, you’ll have the perfect base to leave alone at the end of your project, work an edging onto, or use for seaming. Additionally, it also solves the problem a lot of new crocheters have when the first row or two of a project is more narrow than the rest of the project.

When starting a new crochet pattern, try working into the back of the chain – you might find it to be the perfect starting edge for your next project!

Related Video: Working into Back of Crochet Chain

Discussion
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5 Responses to “Working into the Back of a Chain”
    • Customer Service
      Customer Service

      Hello Patricia,

      Thank you for contacting us.

      Yes it does, whatever you put in the back/bump counts as whatever you would have put in the front!

      Sincerley,

      Sarah
      Creative Crochet Corner Video Membership

      Reply
  1. Kathleen Whitehead
    Kathleen Whitehead

    I learned this a few years ago and use it almost every time I start a project. Easier for me to remember how many chains to go when starting first row and much neater first row especially since my cast on stitches aren’t the neatest even after crocheting over 50 years

    Reply