3 Simple Crochet Edgings

Premium Video Preview: Log in or become a member to get full access.
Duration: 12:20

Membership Options

Premium

Sign up for premium membership and get access to our best crocheting videos and projects. Learn new crocheting techniques and tips from our friendly experts. Anytime. Anywhere.
Monthly $6.00
Annually $49.00

GOLD

Upgrade to GOLD membership and get unlimited access to our entire library of premium crocheting videos, receive discounts on video downloads and classes in the shop. In addition, you’ll receive five full-length classes, ten downloadable patterns, access to GOLD member LIVE events, and so much more!
Annually $129.00

Crochet edgings are a popular way to add something extra special to a project. Crochet edgings for baby blankets and shawls can add unique and delicate details that really turn up the volume on a piece. In this video, Mary Beth Temple explores three simple crochet edgings that you can add to just about any project. She demonstrates a single crochet edging, a crab stitch edging, and a basic shell edging.

SINGLE CROCHET EDGING

A single crochet edging can be used on any project. The number of stitches and rows in a project doesn’t matter, as you can just work a single crochet for each stitch and can easily work it along the side of the project. Mary Beth not only likes to use this as a stand-alone edging, she also will typically work a round of a single crochet edging onto a piece before working a more decorative edging.

CRAB STITCH EDGING

The crab stitch is also known as reverse single crochet. Like the standard single crochet edging, this edging can be easily worked around a piece without having to worrying about the number of stitches or rows in a project.

With the hook orientated in the same way that she would normally hold the hook for single crochet, she single crochets into the next stitch. Mary Beth is working from left to right to create the crab stitch instead of the conventional right to left. She repeats this process, working a single crochet stitch in the next stitch to the right for several more stitches.

SHELL STITCH EDGING

There are hundreds of variations on shell stitch edgings. Unlike the other two edgings demonstrated in the video, this edging requires a little more planning. She works a 5-shell edging by working a single crochet, skipping two stitches (or spaces on the side of the piece), working 5 double crochets into the next stitch, and skipping two more stitches (or spaces). This would be repeated for the entire edging. The edging is worked over a multiple of 6 stitches, so some planning and math will be involved in order to have the edging work around the corner easily. She also experiments with a 7-shell edging. Mary Beth prefers to have a shell in the corner whenever possible.