Adapting an Edge to Work Around a Corner

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Duration: 11:23

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Crocheted edgings are the perfect detail to add some pizzazz to your project. Crocheted baby blankets and crocheted afghans can be worked in simple stitches with a fun edging added to make something unique and special. When working a crocheted edging around a corner, some planning is often involved and in this video Mary Beth Temple explains how to plan and adapt an edging to work around a corner.

For almost every edging, extra stitches will need to be added into the corners in order that they don’t pucker and pull. The only edging that Mary Beth works evenly around a piece without adding extra stitches in the corner is the crab stitch. For all other edgings, the number of stitches that go into the corner is dependent on the stitch. For a simple single crochet border, three single crochet stitches are typically added. For a taller stitch, like a double crochet, 5 stitches are added.

Mary Beth notes that planning to work a crocheted edging around a corner is “more of an art than a science.” She does look at the stitch multiples for an edging and plans to have the largest part of the edging worked into the corner. For example, when working a shell edging, she would plan to have the shell stitch worked into one of the corners. There are times when the stitch multiples of the edging don’t quite work out with the number of stitches and rows on the piece. In that case, Mary Beth adjusts in a couple of ways:

  1. Add a round of single crochet edging before adding the decorative edging. Adjust the stitch count of the edging by working increases or decreases on this single crochet round, so that when the decorative edging is applies, the math is already correct.
  2. Skip stitches or work extra stitches of the decorative edging to “fudge” the math a bit as you go. Be sure to evenly distribute these areas where the edging is adjusted in this manner, so that the edging won’t ruffle or pucker.

With a little planning and practice, it’s easy to adapt a crocheted edging to work around a corner!