Identifying Mistakes in Post Stitches

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Duration: 9:40

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Post stitches in crochet are fun to work and create a ton of texture on your crochet project. They have all sorts of uses from creating cables to making incredibly unique stitch patterns. Like any crochet stitch, sometimes mistakes can happen. With post stitches, it can sometimes be a little tricky to navigate what went wrong. In this video, crochet designer Rebecca Velasquez reviews some of the common mistakes made in post stitches so that you’ll be able to identify and fix them when you come across them in your own projects.

The first common mistake that happens when working a post stitch is that the edge stitches get missed. A fabric made in post stitches tends to curl back on itself, making it easy to miss a stitch along the edge. Rebecca points out that one way to avoid this is to grab a stitch marker and mark the edge stitches, moving the markers up every few rows. It gives you a visual cue and reminds you to work the edge stitches.

Another error that can happen with post stitches is that the fabric doesn’t “pop” like it’s supposed to. Post stitches add a lot of texture to the fabric, and you may sometimes notice that the stitches aren’t really popping off the fabric. Rebecca notes that usually this is an easy fix; it’s likely that the post stitch is being worked in the wrong location. She then demonstrates working post stitches, making sure that she’s working around the entire body (or post) of the stitch in the row below.

Finally, Rebecca explores how it’s easy to change the height of the post stitch, depending on how much you tug on the working yarn while working the post stitch. She notes that this is not really a mistake – it comes down to simply the way people crochet. If you’re finding that you’re struggling to get row gauge on a post stitch pattern, you may need to loosen or tighten the yarn a bit while working the stitch. Now that you’ve identified some of the most common mistakes in post stitch crochet you can go forth and practice your stitches with ease!