Magic Ring

Duration: 3:07

The magic ring is a popular way to start projects like crocheted amigurumi toys and top-down hats. It allows for the project to be started at the center without leaving a hole. In this video, Mister Domestic demonstrates how to create a magic ring.

The magic ring can be called many different names:

  • Magic Circle
  • Disappearing Loop
  • Magic Loop

No matter what you call it, it’s the perfect start to your next crocheted amigurumi project. Mister Domestic begins with approximately 12-inches of a yarn tail. He wraps the tail around two fingers, making an ‘X.’ The crochet hook goes under the yarn and the first strand of yarn is caught with the hook. He brings the hook back through and creates a twist in order to lock the yarn in place.

With the Magic Ring complete, he chains one stitch and then works six single crochet stitches into the ring, making sure to go under both the yarn that makes up the ring and the yarn tail. Once the stitches are made, he pulls on the yarn tail to close the ring. By closing the ring, the stitches come together to form a circle. This first round is finished by slip stitching into the first stitch to join. Mister Domestic notes that there is no gap at the center. This makes it perfect for any crochet amigurumi that starts at the center.

Discussion
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2 Responses to “Magic Ring”
  1. Suzanne Parent
    Suzanne Parent

    When reading patterns to create Amigurumi characters how do i read the Row instructions that are in parentheses . Can someone help me.

    Reply
    • Customer Service
      Customer Service

      Hello,

      While I can’t give you an exact reading as I don’t know what pattern you are looking at, parentheses are used for two reasons. One is, for example, (sc, ch 1, sc) in next stitch. That is telling me that all of those things happen in one place – a stitch in this case or it could be a space.

      The other time parentheses are used is to tell you what part of the instructions you are going to repeat. So if a pattern says, (sc in each of next 3 sc, 2 sc in next sc) 3 times, it is telling you that the instructions in the parenthesis are to be worked three consecutive times. So it would look like sc, sc, sc, 2 sc, sc, sc, sc, 2 sc, sc, sc, sc, 2 sc, then you would read the next part of the pattern.

      Hope this helps!
      MBT

      Reply