Vertical Braided Chains

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Duration: 4:57

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Crochet embellishments like surface chains and crochet embroidery can be a fun a way to add texture and color to just about any project. In this video, Mary Beth Temple demonstrates how to work vertical braided chains.

Mary Beth notes that both the horizontal and vertical braided chains only create the look of a braid – the yarn is not worked over itself to create an actual braid. It only imitates the look of one. When creating the braid, she is using a crochet hook that is one to two sizes smaller than then hook used to create the swatch. Using a slightly smaller hook makes it easier to work the hook into the fabric to create the slip stitches.

To begin, Mary Beth adds a slip knot to her crochet hook. Keeping the working yarn to the Wrong Side (or back) of the fabric, she inserts the hook down through the fabric to the Wrong Side. She works a yarn over from back to front and pulls this loop up through the fabric and through the slip knot. This creates a slip stitch and attaches the working yarn to the fabric.

Instead of working up a single column of stitches, like with a vertical surface chain, the vertical braided chain is worked over two columns of stitches. Mary Beth works into the next stitch to the right of the stitch just worked and creates a slip stitch. She then goes back to the original column and works one stitch above the stitch previously worked in this column. She repeats this process, working one stitch to the right and then one stitch up on the left to create a zig zag. Working into the right column is creating width while working into the column on the left creates height.

Once the crochet embellishment is complete, Mary Beth trims the yarn, leaving a four-to-six-inch tail to weave in at a later time. She pulls the yarn tail through the last stitch to secure the chain and then brings the tail through the same spot where the last stitch was worked. This brings the tail to the Wrong Side to be woven in.