Single Crochet Seam

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Duration: 5:07

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Once you have learned the crochet basics, you’ll want to learn how to join your pieces of crochet fabric. There are many ways to join crochet pieces together. In this video, Corrina Ferguson demonstrates a simple way to seam your crochet projects. She will show you how to work a single crochet seam.

For the demonstration, Corrina is using a contrasting color of yarn so that it’s easy to see how the seam looks when complete. In most cases, you’ll be using the same color of yarn that you used for your project. If you would like to make the seam decorative, a contrasting color would be used.

To start the seam, Corrina places a slip knot on her crochet hook and then inserts the hook under two legs of a stitch on each piece and slip stitches to join. She then starts working single crochet stitches by working under a total of 4 legs (2 legs from each stitch). When working across the top or bottom of crochet pieces, it’s easy to see where the hook should go to create the single crochet seam.

Corrina then explores working a single crochet seam down the side of crochet pieces. She is working with a double crochet fabric. Typically, two single crochets are worked into each double crochet row. However, the most important thing is to keep the seam flat; you may need to adjust this ratio slightly depending on your gauge and the particular project you are making. When working down the side of the fabric, Corrina is careful to work under two strands of the chains along the side. She notes that if you work around the chain (going into the chain space), the seam can pull a bit and be more noticeable.